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2021-02-24 at 17:58:03
Dmitry Mazalevsky from University of Debrecen
will present Changing the role of paratext in American literature in the second half of the 20th century (based on the novels Pale Fire an
Abstract
The paper examines the shift of the role of paratext in American literature in the second half of the 20th century, based on the novel Pale Fire by Vladimir Nabokov and House of Leaves by Mark Z. Danielewski. The main feature of these novels is the extensive footnotes that become the main element of the narrative. Based on the works of a French literary theorist Gérard Genette, footnotes and endnotes can also be considered as paratext or even as fictional paratext. The paper claims that Nabokov and Danielewski managed to turn a paratext into a fiction text, that is, to create a unique type of novel. The paper explores the evolution of the footnote as a part of a fiction and its gradual shift from a supplementary tool, more prevalent in academia, to an important and paramount element of postmodern literature.
In section
American Literature

2021-02-26 at 09:54:52
Kiyotaka Sueyoshi from University of Szeged
will present ‘New Decorums’: Whitman’s olfactory metaphors in Song of Myself
Abstract
In Song of Myself, especially in sections 1 and 2, olfactory metaphors abound. This employment of olfactory metaphors is connected to Whitman’s language experiment which he calls “new decorums.” This focus on the sense of smell – the lowest sense – signifies the all-inclusive nature of the poem, and helps to initiate readers into the state where our corporeality is forefronted and the harmony between individuality and the whole is possible. Furthermore, Whitman’s olfactory metaphors serve to advance the transcendentalists’ general enterprise to express their ideas, particularly first hand revelations which, according to them, can occur to everyone. Yet, there have been few critical studies on Whitman’s olfactory metaphors in Song of Myself. This paper investigates these metaphors and shows how they are the core to the semantics of the poem.
In section
American Literature

2021-02-27 at 15:33:11
Thomas A. Williams from University of Szeged
will present Identity in progress: Life narrative and identity in a Hungarian English major from Vojvodina
Abstract
Based on the understanding that identity is constructed through self-narrative (Bruner 1987; Fougère 2008), the paper will present findings from an interview with a Hungarian native speaker from the Vojvodina region of Serbia, studying in the English Studies BA programme at the University of Szeged (Hungary). Themes explored in the data include: sensemaking (the process of an ever changing understanding of an ever changing identity); a sense of belonging with a focus on insideness and outsideness, competence and role fulfilment, and centre and periphery dynamics; questioning and learning about the self; and development and change, including heterotopias and the ‘third space’, and dwelling in-between. The findings have implications for foreign language learners, teachers, administrators, teacher trainers, educational policymakers, coursebook and other materials designers and anyone involved in foreign language learning and teaching, which is by definition an experience marked – and enriched – by multiple cultural and linguistic identities.
In section
Language Studies

2021-02-27 at 19:30:22
Cristina Amarilis Bota from University of Oradea, Faculty of Letters
will present Art and Morality in Quo Vadis and The Picture of Dorian Gray
Abstract
This paper aims to comparatively analyse the views and the links between art and morality in Quo Vadis: A Narrative of the Time of Nero and The Picture of Dorian Gray, starting from the historical and theoretical background of the novels, and focusing on the similarities and differences between their themes and motifs, influences, and the meanings of the novels’ endings. Ultimately, the goal is to find out whether the true and most treasured aestheticism is morally inherent, more than pleasing the eye, if it yields elegance of the soul.
In section
British and Commonwealth Literature

2021-02-27 at 20:06:54
Aurelija Daukšaitė-Kolpakovienė from Vytautas Magnus University
will present Transmitted Memories in David Whitehouse’s The Long Forgotten
Abstract
The presentation aims to discuss how transmitted memories are represented in David Whitehouse’s novel The Long Forgotten (2018). Dove Gale, the protagonist, remembers memories that are not his own individual memories but rather transmitted memories of other characters. In other words, these are "memories of memories" (Pickering and Keightley 2012). They help Dove understand who he really is and where he comes from. The discussion relies on memory studies, especially works by Marianne Hirsch (1996, 2006, 2008), and relevant concepts in the field.
In section
British and Commonwealth Literature