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2021-02-16 at 19:49:56
Muresan Aurel from Emanuel University of Oradea
will present Wonderful And Monstrous: Marina Warner’s Development of Sycorax in the Novel “Indigo”
Abstract
This paper analyzes the evolution of the character of Sycorax in the novel “Indigo”,
looking closely at the power of perception, the limits of the accepted supernatural and the
transformation of the wonderful into the monstrous when the culturally accepted boundaries are
crossed.
In section
British and Commonwealth Literature

2021-02-17 at 09:15:14
Ciutacu Sorin from West University of Timișoara (Romania)
will present The Royal Society in the Dutch Connection
Abstract
The paper focuses on two Dutch scholars, Isaac Vossius and Christiaan Huygens, who became members of the Royal Society in the 17th century. The author sets out to bring to light vivid philosophical and scientific ideas exchanged in their bulky correspondence with English members of the Royal Society like Henry Oldenburg and Isaac Newton and during the Dutch scholars' visits in London. The author concludes that this exchange laid the foundations for a brisk and rich intellectual network of co-operation in Europe.
In section
Cultural Studies

2021-02-18 at 01:28:15
Szekely Eva from University of Oradea
will present From the “Second Coming” to “1 September 1939” and “London Rain”
Abstract
My paper is an intertextual study of the representation of evil in W.B. Yeats’s emblematic poem written after the end of World War I, and W.H. Auden’s and Louis MacNeice’s poems that were written at the outbreak of World War II.
In section
British and Commonwealth Literature

2021-02-20 at 15:23:25
Khanim Garayeva from University of Szeged
will present Scientific nature of Esotericism in A. Szerb’s The Pendragon Legend
Abstract
While modern world focuses on the rationalisation of natural events, the half of it is still sacralising the nature, cosmos and material reality under the concepts of the New Age science or New Age religions. Despite the fact that throughout the centuries, the close connection between esotericism and science had been disregarded by many, this interconnectedness became a subject to a certain type of fiction. "Intellectual esotericism" (the term I offer) is a general term for particular novels as such, where the demarcation line between science and the occult is blurred. In this paper I will concentrate on a historiographic metafictional novel called "The Pendragon Legend" by the Hungarian writer Antal Szerb’s to demonstrate the literary representation of the occult lure in the scientific circles, the relationship between the esoteric practices and rational thinking. "Scientific occultists" (my suggestion as well) of the novels will be elaborated on as the main, yet controversial, driving forces of the existing interconnectedness between these world views.
In section
Cultural Studies

2021-02-24 at 11:57:28
HOGAR NAJM ABDULLAH from University of Szeged, Hungary
will present 1950s Black Masculinity’s Dilemmas of (In)Visibility in Ann Petry’s The Narrows and Ralph Ellison’s Invisible Man
Abstract
This paper highlights the ways Ann Petry’s The Narrows (1953) and Ralph Ellison’s Invisible Man (1952) showcase the dilemmas of African American men in accomplishing their masculinity due to either their hypervisibility or invisibility. Based on Kimberlé Crenshaw’s (2000) theory that the categories of race, gender and class create a site of intersectional invisibility for certain individuals, African American masculinity struggle with their sense of inability to make a balance between the hegemonic western ideals of masculinity and their racialized identities. To resist the grip of this intersection, Petry stresses out her main character’s facial features as being too attractive and too handsome; while, Ellison embraces a narrator whose physical features are almost invisible. I, thus, argue that this technique of marking out/off the physical features of their novels’ protagonists is one method Petry and Ellison rely on to challenge the stereotypical representations of black men in the 1950s.
In section
American Literature