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2021-02-16 at 06:05:22
Dibakar Pal from PhD Student, University of Calcutta
will present OF UNNECESSARY
Abstract
A lover waits for the partner. The partner betrays. In such a case waiting causes unnecessary loss of time. Yet the lovers wait since time immemorial. Without waiting one cannot meet the lover. Waiting is necessary but not sufficient condition to conquer the head and heart of the fiancée. Waiting is a risky game. Sometimes it reciprocates. Sometimes it reciprocates not. Thus the mood and motif of the lover are gloriously so uncertain. No risk no gain implies high risk high gain. As such risk is not or may not be unnecessary always. Here lies the uniqueness of unnecessary things.
In section
Other

2021-02-16 at 08:30:22
Marinau Andrada from University of Oradea
will present Revisiting the Pandemics That Shaped the History of Britain
Abstract
We often talk about wars and natural disasters as events that altered the history of the world. Another event that led to major changes would be the pandemic.
This article revisits the three pandemics that shaped the history of Britain and affected the royal family as well: The Plague, Smallpox and Influenza.
In section
Cultural Studies

2021-02-16 at 13:03:25
Rasha Fuad M. Awale from Debrecen University
will present HOW THE “GREAT SATAN” EMPOWERED THE MULLAHS: WEAPONIZING ANTI-AMERICANISM AND FORTIFYING IRAN’S DOMESTIC FRONT
Abstract
This paper posits that the legacy of American intervention in Iran (military involvement, toppling Iran’s first democratic experience in 1953, and empowering the shah’s regime) is the main source of Iranian resentment toward the United States. More specifically, it claims that anti-American rhetoric was used strategically in Iran before and after the Islamic Revolution of 1979 to mobilize the masses, alienate moderates, persecute opposition, and justify Iran’s indulgence in regional affairs. In the wake of the United States’ assassination of General Qasem Soleimani, the second most powerful man in Iran in 2020, Iranian authorities have yet again implemented anti-American discourse to mobilize Iranians against the United States, justify the regime’s atrocities, and divert public opinion from the economic crisis. Anti-Americanism thus became a tool to empower and enable the anti-democratic policies of the regime in Teheran.
Keywords: Anti-Americanism, Iran, Islamic revolution, Middle East, U.S. foreign policy.

In section
Cultural Studies

2021-02-16 at 16:54:35
Jillian Curr from University of Western Australia
will present Honour and Muslim Masculinities in Elif Shafak’s Honour
Abstract
In post 9/11 honour crimes are often associated with Muslim patriarchal societies, however, Elif Shafak’s more nuanced exploration of gender in Kurdish/Turkish traditional communities provide the background to a changing landscape between modernity and tradition, extremism and Sufism. This paper will investigate the role of performative subordinate and hegemonic masculinities in the production of honour and belonging and Muslim-ness. Keywords: masculinities, honour, Muslim-ness, identity
In section
British and Commonwealth Literature

2021-02-16 at 17:49:40
Vanja Vukicevic Garic from University of Montenegro, Faculty of Philology
will present Textualizing the Survival and Re-contextualizing the “It“ in Doris Lessing’s The Memoirs of a Survivor
Abstract
Abstract: While clearly fitting into descriptions of dystopian, arcadian and (post-)apocalyptic genres (Rosenfeld, 2005), Doris Lessing’s The Memoirs of a Survivor (1974) can also be regarded as a psychological and self-conscious postmodernist narrative, in which the Ich-form of a memoir foregrounds the intriguing questions of the borderline between (personal) text and (social) context. The cause of the social and cultural breakdown in the novel is referred to as an unspecified “it” – an all-pervading menacing presence that changed everyone’s life.
This paper will focus on the interpretative possibilities to creatively re-define the threats posed by the external “it”, stressing out the internal “leap” of the narrator who textualizes her experience of the survival, transcending its limits in the process that, in Baudrillard’s terms, can be called the “symbolic exchange” (Baudrillard, 1976), which deconstructs the conventional life-death binary opposition. Keywords: (post-)apocalyptic, “it”, re-contextualization, self-conscious text, survival, transcendence.

In section
British and Commonwealth Literature